Trusting others

Contexts when it is appropriate for a child to trust others’ qualities, skills, ideas and opinions

  • When choosing to seek support
  • When choosing to join in or go along what others are doing
  • When choosing to be tolerant and accepting about what others say or do
  • When choosing to intentionally trust someone

For example,

  • Accepting a decision even if you don’t always agree
  • Going along with what others are doing, even if it can be frustrating at times
  • Telling a teacher when you need help and expecting them to help once you’ve had a go on your own
  • Accepting that when you make a mistake people will be forgiving
  • Accepting that people make mistakes and accepting their apology
  • Having a go or taking a risk because people will be there to help
  • Trusting that people will be supportive when you have a go at something new
  • Trusting that people will be welcoming to you when you go somewhere new
  • Trusting other people with tasks and responsibilities rather than doing it all yourself
  • Working on a shared task and valuing every contribution
  • Asking people you trust for advice when you have a problem
  • Affirming or praising other people in a meaningful way
  • Noticing other people’s qualities and skills
  • Taking on board other people’s ideas

 

Contexts when it is appropriate for a child to question others’ qualities, skills, ideas and opinions

  • When choosing not to seek support
  • When choosing not to join in or go along what others are doing
  • When choosing to be cautious or sceptical about what others say or do
  • When choosing to intentionally question someone’s qualities, skills, ideas and opinions

For example,

  • Choosing to stick with your own opinion rather than changing it because others disagree
  • Asking for permission to have or take something, rather than assuming it is ok
  • Not posting private information on social media in case others use it inappropriately
  • Choosing not to spend time with someone who has let you down or hurt you
  • Giving someone feedback about how they could improve
  • Not getting drawn into conversations which are unkind or unhealthy
  • Reading critically, rather than assuming what you are reading is true or fair
  • Choosing not to share too much with someone you have only recently met
  • Noticing that someone is busy and not interrupting them
  • Persevering with something difficult rather than asking for help or given up
  • Finding your own solution rather than assuming others can help you
  • Offering an alternative perspective in a discussion rather than going along with what others say
  • Asking questions rather than accepting thing as they are
  • Choosing not go along with something that is unkind, foolish or dangerous
  • Saying no to someone who asks you to do something you don’t feel comfortable about
  • Ignoring a comment from someone whose opinion doesn’t matter

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